ST. LOUIS, MO (KTVI) – Murders in the Middle East and an anti-Islam video have created turmoil and anger across the country, the world and in the presidential campaign.

The American ambassador to Libya and three other americans were murdered and us embassies across the Islamic world were attacked this week. It started with a video attacking the prophet Mohammed. And it once again raises questions about Islam and it’s relationship to America. Is Islam a religion of violence? And how badly has his reaction to it hurt Mitt Romney’s presidential chances?  The Jaco Report takes a look.

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The August 6 fire  destroyed the center.  It remains under investigation by both the FBI and the ATF.  The building is located outside the city of Joplin.  Syed said the Muslims have  experienced strong interfaith support inside the city limits, but more rural parts of Jasper County present a problem.   After the fire, “We did have people drive by and shout profanities and slurs.”

Speakers in St. Louis praised people from around the world who have donated $400,000 in less than two weeks to help the families rebuild their house of worship. Dr. Ghazala Hayat of the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis said,  “We are really heartened by the response by non-Muslims in the city to raise money so quickly to build up the mosque again.”

 ”We believe the real enemy is fundamentalism in any religion no matter what it is Muslim, Christian, Jewish, Hinduism,”   said Sister Barbara Jennings of the Interfaith Community Justice Ministry.

Brenda Jones, Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union called for an end to hate crimes.  “The real extremism is in the steady trend of discrimination against Muslims and other religions based upon cultural stereotyping,” she said.

The President of the St. Louis Rabbinical Association and a Rabbi at United Hebrew Congregation Rabbi Brigitte Rosenberg urged people to “Look at each other as creations of God and look at each other and see the goodness and to break down those walls and those stereotypes.”

Jones added, “Religious discrimination chips away at our core values of equality and fair play.  It tarnishes the very democracy we worked so hard to promote.”

Karen Aroesty, Regional Director of the Anti-Defamation League   and Vanessa Crawford Aragon of the Missouri Immigrant and Refugee Advocates also spoke out against the violence.

CAIR-St. Louis has provided security tips to Muslim communities in Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas and Oklahoma this summer.  The advice helps Islamist centers prepare for violence, reach out to their local police departments and recommends increasing security at mosques particularly during the Ramadan celebration.

For more information visit www.cair-stlouis.com

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St. Louis on the Air: 9/11 Remembrance

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St. Louis on the Air - Archives

 A discussion about how life has changed in the eleven years since the tragedy on September 11, 2001.

Listen to Executive Director of CAIR-St.Louis, Faizan Syed "On the Air" discussing life for Muslims in the United States 11 years after 9/11. The show discusses security, Islamophobia, the future of the Muslim community, and much more.

For the Full Article Click Here...

Download and Listen to the Recordings Click Below:

911 Remembrance

September 10, 2012

Segment A

A discussion about how life has changed in the eleven years since the tragedy on September 11, 2001.

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Guests

Nick Gragnani 
Executive Director
St. Louis Area Regional Response System (STARRS)

Faizan Syed 
Executive Director
Council on American Islamic Relations in Saint Louis

Bill Switzer 
Federal Security Director
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at Lambert – St. Louis International Airport

Related Information

St. Louis Area Regional Response System (STARRS)
A regional organization developed to coordinate planning and response for large-scale critical incidents in the bi-state metropolitan region.

KPLR 11: READ FULL ARTICLE HERE

JOPLIN, MO (KPLR)– Human rights and interfaith leaders in St. Louis are calling on Americans to stop being intolerant of different religions.  They gathered outside the Dar Al Salam mosque in Ballwin Wednesday to talk about the loss of the mosque and community center in Joplin, MO destroyed last week by a fire the FBI considers suspicious.

A total of eight attacks against Muslim houses of worship have occurred in the past twelve days, all during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

“There’s a group of people outside Joplin, in Jasper County filled with hate, filled with intolerance and they have no justice inside their hearts unfortunately,” said Faizan Syed, Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations of St. Louis. (CAIR-St. Louis)

A small fire on July 4 damaged the roof and side of the Joplin mosque that serves fifty Muslim families.  Law enforcement officials have ruled that fire arson.  There is a total of $25,000 worth of reward money, $15,000 from the FBI and ATF and $10,000 from CAIR, being offered for information that leads to a conviction in the case.

The August 6 fire  destroyed the center.  It remains under investigation by both the FBI and the ATF.  The building is located outside the city of Joplin.  Syed said the Muslims have  experienced strong interfaith support inside the city limits, but more rural parts of Jasper County present a problem.   After the fire, “We did have people drive by and shout profanities and slurs.”

Speakers in St. Louis praised people from around the world who have donated $400,000 in less than two weeks to help the families rebuild their house of worship. Dr. Ghazala Hayat of the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis said,  “We are really heartened by the response by non-Muslims in the city to raise money so quickly to build up the mosque again.”

 ”We believe the real enemy is fundamentalism in any religion no matter what it is Muslim, Christian, Jewish, Hinduism,”   said Sister Barbara Jennings of the Interfaith Community Justice Ministry.

Brenda Jones, Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union called for an end to hate crimes.  “The real extremism is in the steady trend of discrimination against Muslims and other religions based upon cultural stereotyping,” she said.

The President of the St. Louis Rabbinical Association and a Rabbi at United Hebrew Congregation Rabbi Brigitte Rosenberg urged people to “Look at each other as creations of God and look at each other and see the goodness and to break down those walls and those stereotypes.”

Jones added, “Religious discrimination chips away at our core values of equality and fair play.  It tarnishes the very democracy we worked so hard to promote.”

Karen Aroesty, Regional Director of the Anti-Defamation League   and Vanessa Crawford Aragon of the Missouri Immigrant and Refugee Advocates also spoke out against the violence.

CAIR-St. Louis has provided security tips to Muslim communities in Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas and Oklahoma this summer.  The advice helps Islamist centers prepare for violence, reach out to their local police departments and recommends increasing security at mosques particularly during the Ramadan celebration.

For more information visit www.cair-stlouis.com

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Faizan Syed offers harrowing account of visit to Joplin temple after fire

St. Louis County (KSDK) - Representatives of the St. Louis chapter of CAIR, the Council on American-Islamic Relations, are united in their opposition to the treatment of Muslims in southwest Missouri.


They held a news conference Wednesday to outline their concerns about two fires within the past month at an Islamic temple in Jasper County, Missouri, near Joplin. 

At that news conference, Faizan Syed, Executive Director of CAIR offered a harrowing account of something he witnessed while he was visiting the site of the Islamic Society of Joplin after the fire. 

"I was there with David Meyers," said Syed, "who was the envoy for the President of the United States. And there were children going through the rubble trying to salvage whatever they could. And there were people driving by in their trucks cursing the mosque, cursing the children. It was very, very offensive cursing. And this happened after the mosque had been burned down, as the press is there, when the envoy is there." 

Syed said David Meyers is coordinator for the Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnership Office of the White House. Syed offered what he witnessed as evidence of the atmosphere Muslims in southwest Missouri are facing. 

"We've gathered here today to show our support as a community in St. Louis," said Syed. "But also as an American community. The message is that we support the Muslim community of Joplin during their time of tragedy. And that we are all here and gathered to show our solidarity in that community as well." 

The Islamic temple was completely destroyed after fires July 5 and August 6. CAIR officials are offering a $15,000 reward for information that helps investigators determine who is responsible. Combined with what the FBI is already offering, that bring the total reward to $25,000. 

"We're hoping that with this offer and with this reward money and with the media attention that somebody who knows who did this will come forward, and we can have justice in that community as well," said Syed. 

He said in the last 12 days there have been eight attacks at Muslim houses of worship. 

"And of course the Sikh shooting in Wisconsin," he said, "which preceded all of this. And these attacks are not individual, isolated incidents. Rather this is part of an atmosphere of hate that's being created by a small group of radical Islamophobes in this country." 

Dr. Ghazala Hayat, with the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis lent her voice to the stand against bigotry. 

"The Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis greatly condemns the burning of the mosque in Joplin," said Dr. Hayat. "Joplin is a city where last year every faith, every community came together. This time what we saw is hatred." 

Hayat said she believes acts of this nature increase during an election year. 

"This rhetoric goes up," she said. "Unfortunately politicians for their own political gain use this kind of rhetoric. People who are not very open to other faiths usually have words for our people. They commit these kinds of crimes. Burning a mosque was very disheartening to Muslims all over the country; we heard from a lot of people. St. Louis has this brotherhood with that group. But I would also like to say we are really heartened by the response of non-Muslims in that city to raise money to build a mosque again." 

Sister Barbara Jennings is a Catholic nun who also spoke at the news conference. A member of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, Jennings said she is also part of the Inter-Community Justice Ministry, which she described as a coalition of Catholic sisters in St. Louis. 

"We deplore the burning and defacement of any place of worship in this country or anywhere," said Sister Jennings. "Christ taught and practiced non-violence; that's the meaning of the cross. Christ forgave his persecutors. Christ taught love, not hate. Even love of enemies. We believe the real enemy here is fundamentalism in any religion. No matter what it is-Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Hinduism-- fundamentalism is the real enemy." 

Jennings said Christians are called to face their fear and ignorance. 

"We are called to recognize these in ourselves and to follow Christ in eradicating these," she said. "So we hope that all people who have been involved in these acts will take a strong look at themselves and their lack of understanding, their lack of courage and diversity in this country." 

Brigitte Rosenberg is Rabbinical Association President and rabbi at United Hebrew Congregation. 

"Within our tradition in the book of Leviticus," said Rabbi Rosenberg, "we are taught our responsibility toward our fellow man. We are taught to love our neighbors as ourselves and not stand idly by while our neighbors bleed. And certainly as Americans this is most important; that we will not stand for the burning down of a mosque or the defacement of houses of worship. And that hatred cannot take place in our community." 

Rosenberg said the Jewish tradition teaches that each person is created in the image of God. 

"That no matter our race our religion," she said, "where we hail from, that each and every one of us was created in God's image; that each and every one of us has that divineness from God that is within us. We need to look at each other as creations from God and look to see the goodness, and break down those walls and stereotypes." 

Vanessa Crawford Aragon is with MIRA, the Missouri Immigrant and Refugee Advocate. 

"The reason things like this happen, this spate of hate crimes against places of worship," said Crawford Aragon, "is that people are targeting those they view as different than themselves. What we can't do is this continual demonization that because someone is Muslim, because someone is Sikh, born in a different country, a different race, that they are somehow suspicious." 

Brenda Jones is with the ACLU of Eastern Missouri. 

"I am here to declare that there are no second-class citizens in America, and it is not open season on Muslims in America," said Jones. "Our government, legal systems, and legislative systems were set up to limit bigotry, not promote intolerance." 

Jones said a cycle driven by fear, hatred, and ignorance has been steadily escalating since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. 

"I don't think it's a coincidence that so much of the violence has come in the wake of Rep. Peter King's hearings on so-called 'Muslim extremism,'" she said. "The real extremism is in the steady trend of discrimination against Muslims and other religions based upon cultural stereotyping." 

Jones cited other recent examples of similar incidents from all over the country. 

"This is not okay," she said. "None of this is okay. And our criminal justice system needs to spend just a fraction of the time it spends on making America safe from so-called illegal aliens, just a fraction of the time to find and prosecute these culprits." 

Karen Aroesty represented the Anti-Defamation League. 

"The response has been very interesting," she said, talking about the aftermath of the Joplin mosque fires. "In some ways it's very positive. That is, interfaith communities have come together to support Muslim communities, not only around the region but around the country. That they've also been forced to by the incidents in Milwaukee at the Sikh Temple." 

Aroesty said it's not just Muslims who should feel at-risk. 

"We should all feel at risk," she said. "Because frankly if one of us is a target at any one time, any of us can be a target."

KSDK

(ST. LOUIS, MO, 5/12/06) - On Thursday May 11, the St. Louis chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-St. Louis) received a "What's Right with the Region" Award from FOCUS, an organization that honors individuals and organizations who make the St. Louis area a better place to live.

CAIR-St Louis was honored specifically for improving racial equality and promoting social justice in the area.

Kamal Yassin, CAIR-St. Louis President, accepted the award on the chapter's behalf and said that it is part of CAIR's mission to encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, and to build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding in communities across America.

Interfaith, civil rights leaders in Ballwin decry recent attacks on mosques

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BALLWIN • Muslim, Christian and Jewish religious leaders joined civil rights leaders here this morning in denouncing recent attacks against mosques around the country.

They say that kind of violence represents intolerance and a hatred of Muslims, and they worry it escalates during election season.

"This is a result of an atmosphere of hate that is being created by a small group of radical Islamophobes within this country," said Faizan Syed, executive director of the St. Louis chapter of CAIR (Council on American-Islamic Relations).

Ghazala Hayat, with the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis, added: "We also see, usually the year of election, this rhetoric goes up."

At a news conference, they were joined by Barbara Jennings, with the Coalition of Catholic Sisters; Rabbi Brigitte Rosenberg, president of the Rabbinical Association; and civil rights leaders including Brenda Jones of the ACLU of Eastern Missouri and Karen Aroesty of the Anti-Defamation League.

A July 4 arson fire damaged a mosque in Joplin, Mo., and a second fire on Aug. 6 destroyed it. The second fire has been labeled suspicious. An investigation continues.

The national group CAIR is offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whoever is responsible for the attempted arson on July 4. Syed said the group had planned Wednesday to announce an increase in that reward to include the Aug. 6 fire, but he said they would wait until officials confirm that it was arson.

Syed said the St. Louis group has contacted Islamic centers in Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas and Oklahoma to warn them to beef up security measures, during Friday prayers and other times. He said what happened to the mosque outside Joplin underscored the anger sometimes directed toward such centers. He said that mosque had been targeted even before the arson attempt in July. Shotgun shells had been fired at the center's mailbox and people driving by had yelled profanities at children, he said.

Meanwhile, he said the mosque there will rebuild, thanks to a national fundraising campaign. He said about $400,000 had been raised in a short time, but that it will take close to $1.4 million to rebuild in or near Joplin.

"We are really heartened by the response by non-Muslims to raise money so quickly," Hayat added.

Syed said the Muslim community in Joplin consists of about 50 families and many of them are doctors and professionals. "They're entrenched there; they're not going anywhere," he said.

Syed said the debate now within that Muslim community is whether they should rebuild inside the Joplin city limits where they might feel safer. The other option is to rebuild where the other one burned down, outside the city, to let people know that they will not be driven away.

Jones, of the ACLU office in St. Louis, said the message she wants to give is that there are no second-class citizens and "it is not open season on Muslims in America."

She said "it is no coincidence" that the increase in the attacks against mosques comes as Peter King, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, held hearings on Muslim extremism.

Nationally, the recent attacks have included someone throwing a soda bottle filled with acid at an Islamic school in Lombard, Ill.; and vandals shooting paintballs at a center in Oklahoma City.

CAIR-ST. LOUIS: FORUM TO FOCUS ON MUSLIMS' RIGHTS IN POST-SEPT. 11 NATION

After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, then Attorney General John Ashcroft ordered the FBI to detain anyone who may have been in contact with the men who were involved in hijacking three planes and crashing them in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania and killing more than 2,700 people.

Agents arrested close to 5,000 Arab and Muslim men, about 800 of whom were charged with violations of U.S. immigration laws. Most of the men were eventually released or deported. However, five years after his arrest, Ali Partovi still sits in an Arizona detention center.

The story of these men is told in "Persons of Interest," a 2004 documentary by Alison Maclean and Tobias Perse that features interviews with the detainees and their families. Portions of the film will be shown tonight at Ragtag Cinemacafe, as part of a presentation by Gulten Ilhan, a professor of philosophy at St. Louis Community College at Meramec and an expert on Islam and interfaith relationships.

"Targeting Muslim Rights: Private Provocation and Public Action" will focus on the civil rights of Muslims in America since Sept. 11, and how the media, religious leaders, politicians and others portray people of Islamic faith in the U.S.

"This is about public education," said Ilhan, who is the vice president of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in St. Louis. "Because I look at myself as the new Jew, the new Black, or the new Japanese. There is still a lot of racial profiling and many people are suffering because of their religious beliefs."

CAIR is also offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whoever may have caused today's fire. The Washington-based Muslim civil rights organization is in touch with the FBI about the case.

Fire officials are investigating the second fire at the Islamic Society of Joplin this summer. The blaze, which engulfed the entire structure, was reported early Monday. Mosque officials tell CAIR the facility, valued at an estimated $600,000, had been targeted by bias-motivated incidents a number of times in the past.

A small fire at the same building in July was determined to be arson. At that time, CAIR called for state and federal hate crime investigations of the fire.

CAIRVideo of Apparent Arson Attack on Missouri Mosque

Yesterday, CAIR issued a statement expressing the Muslim community's solidarity with Sikhs following a deadly shooting at a house of worship of that faith in Wisconsin.

VideoCAIR Stands with Sikhs After Wis. Shootings

The alleged perpetrator of that act of domestic terrorism reportedly had a "9/11 tattoo on one arm." CAIR noted that Sikh men who wear beards and turbans as part of their faith are often targeted by bigots who mistake them for Muslims.

SEEGunman's Tattoos Lead Officials to Deem Sikh Shooting Terrorism
Gunman 
Had 9/11 Tattoo on One Arm (CNN)
Alleged Sikh Temple Shooter 
Former Member of Skinhead Band

"These disturbing incidents point to the urgent need for increased police protection for Muslim and Sikh houses of worship nationwide," said CAIR National Executive Director Nihad Awad. "If left unchallenged, religious intolerance can and does harm innocent people."

Because of these two most recent incidents targeting American houses of worship, and because of previous attacks on American mosques, CAIR is urging religious leaders nationwide to review advice on security procedures contained in its "Muslim Community Safety Kit."

CAIRMosque Attacks Common Nationwide

CAIR is America's largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization. Its mission is to enhance the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding.

- END -

CONTACT: CAIR-St. Louis Executive Director Faizan Syed, 636-207-8882, 314-330-2946, E-Mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; CAIR National Communications Director Ibrahim Hooper, 202-744-7726, E-Mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; CAIR

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CAIR-MO vision is to be a leading advocate for justice and mutual understanding. Our mission is to enhance understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding.

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